Meet our People

From graduates of premier water-focused masters programs to career professionals, Mountain Waterworks retains engineers, scientists, former utility managers, and support staff who have a passion for water. We thrive on collaboration — not just because it makes it easier to engage with the community and other stakeholders, but because we believe in the power of long-term relationships.

Let’s discover what we can do together.

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Stuart Hurley, P.E.

Principal Engineer

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Tim Farrell, P.E.

Principal Engineer

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Ryan Rehder, P.E.

Regional Office Manager

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Kristina Gillespie-Jaques

Business Manager

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Mike Woodworth, P.E.

Engineering Manager

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Bryan Donaldson

Senior Project Manager

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John Stone

Infrastructure Specialist

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Ed Stowe, P.E.

Project Manager

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Lance Dennis, P.E.

Senior Project Engineer

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Chad Hoopes

Infrastructure Specialist

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Zach Cox

Infrastructure Specialist

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Terrence Stevenson, P.E.

Senior Project Engineer

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Derek Probst, P.E.

Senior Project Engineer

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Emily Nicholas, P.E.

Project Engineer

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Cody Sprague, P.E.

Project Engineer

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Sam Nieslanik, E.I.T.

Staff Engineer I

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Eric Molten, E.I.T.

Staff Engineer I

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Madison Rosen

Environmental Scientist
and GIS Specialist

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Steve Bennett

Senior Technical Designer

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Ken King

Senior Technical Designer

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Gavin Hammer

Technical Designer

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Bri Cornwall

Project Coordinator

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Maddi Osburn

Project Administrator

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Brandon Hoyt

Administrative Specialist

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Warren Drake

Infrastructure Specialist

James Starr

Office Administrator

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James Starr

Office Administrator

“…The public can best be provided water services by self-sustaining enterprises that are adequately financed with rates and charges based on sound accounting, engineering, financial, and economic principles.”

“The collection and treatment of domestic sewage and wastewater is vital to public health and clean water. It is among the most important factors responsible for the general level of good health enjoyed in the United States.”

“One-fifth of the US economy would grind to a halt without a reliable and clean source of water.”

“We can no longer afford to defer investment in our nation’s infrastructure.”

“Because America’s drinking water infrastructure provides a critical service, significant new investment and increased efficiencies are needed as filtration plants, pipes, and pumps age past their useful life.”

“While drinking water infrastructure is funded primarily through a rate-based system, the investment has been inadequate for decades and will continue to be underfunded without significant changes as the revenue generated will fall short as needs grow.”

“Traditionally biosolids were considered waste and transferred to landfills. However, when properly treated and processed biosolids become nutrient rich organic material that can be applied as fertilizer or, through the use of anaerobic digesters and centrifuges, can be pelletized and incinerated at high pressure and temperature for use as energy.”

“As cities continue to experience population growth, particularly in the south and west, new housing developments are constructed, and rural households switch from septic systems to public sewers, pressure on existing centralized systems and treatment plant infrastructure will require billions of dollars in new investment to meet federal regulatory requirements.”

“Of all the infrastructure types, water is the most fundamental to life, and is irreplaceable for drinking, cooking, and bathing.”

“…Many industries–food and chemical manufacturing and power plants, for example–could not operate without the clean water that is a component of finished processes or that is used for industrial processes or cooling.”